NEW PHILADELPHIA -- Step back in time nearly 250 years to see the location of the first church and school west of the Allegheny Mountains. Along the banks of the Tuscarawas River in New Philadelphia, experience historic Schoenbrunn Village.

A group of Christian Delaware Indians arrived from Pennsylvania with Moravian missionary, David Zeisberger, in 1772. They came by invitation of Chief Netawatwes, head of the Turtle Tribe in the Tuscarawas Valley of Ohio.

Near a big spring, deep in the woods, a settlement was established called Beautiful Spring by the Delaware Indians, but translated into Schoenbrunn by the Germans. This provided a safe place for the Delaware Indians who had converted to the Moravian faith. Religious services were an important part of each day.

From 1772-1777, this village housed approximately 300 people. The only white people there were Zeisberger, his assistant missionary and the missionary's wife. The remainder of the village consisted of Christian Delaware Indians.

The village had a short five-year existence due to pressure from both Delaware Indians, and frontiersmen wanting to settle in Ohio. Originally the village contained about 40 buildings, but over time these buildings were destroyed, the land was farmed, and all traces removed of the settlement.

The people of Tuscarawas County wished to commemorate this development. Maps, letters and the original diaries of Zeisberger led them to the general area where the town existed. After extensive research and archaeological excavations, the sites of the school and church were discovered and rebuilding of Schoenbrunn began in 1927.

At the entrance stands a museum filled with historic exhibits and an excellent video explaining the history of Zeisberger and the founding of Schoenbrunn Village. Here you will find tools the Delaware Indians used, the original school bell, and books written by Zeisberger. These included a translation of the Four Gospels into Delaware Indian language.

Today, Schoenbrunn contains seventeen reconstructed buildings, including the church and the school on their original sites. The place of the cemetery has also been discovered, but the stones were created in the 1920s. The Moravians had used identical wooden crosses on all graves because they felt all were equal in death.

The candlemakers in the Davis cabin actually still make all the candles used throughout the village. They were made of pure beeswax in those early days, to signify the purity of Christ. The Davis cabin served as home to a Native American, his wife and four children. The walls in many of the cabins were whitewashed in order to reflect the candle light.

Their schoolhouse sat in the center of the village where both boys and girls received instruction in their native Delaware language. Two doors entered the building - one for the girls to use, and one for the boys. In 1775, there were approximately one hundred children being educated.

Everything in their community from school and church to their burial in God's Acre was divided into what they called "choirs." The young men and boys were placed together, the young women and girls, and then older men and older women. They did not congregate as families or get buried as such.

Authentically dressed volunteers, who all have a passion for history, help visitors understand what life was like in the 18th century. They serve as storytellers to explain the daily life of the early residents as well as the importance of missions in American history.

Visit historic Schoenbrunn Village Monday through Sunday from Memorial Day to the end of August. In September and October, they are only open on Saturday and Sunday. It's a great place for a family excursion, where you can have an enjoyable outdoor adventure while learning about the history of early America.