WEST LAFAYETTE -- Even though West Lafayette Village Council has voted down the plan for a tax levy to replace the village's swimming pool, the plan to continue looking at other possibilities is still a viable option, according to Mayor Jack Patterson.

Village councilmembers met in special session Aug. 2 to consider placing a bond issue on the November ballot to replace the swimming pool.

According to Mayor Patterson, councilmembers voted 4 to 2 on the decision for additional readings that are required before voting to create the ordinance.

Councilmembers Dave Rogers, Christie Maurer, Kelly Gossett and Roger Warne voted against the measure, while councilmembers Dean Wears and Ron Lusk voted for it.

"Time to study the issue further, gather more details, look at more options, and concerns about the cost are the bottom line," Mayor Patterson said.

Village Administrator Dave Kadri added that council was greatly concerned about the uncertainty of the estimated cost to replace the pool.

Village Administrator Dave Kadri added that council was greatly concerned about the uncertainty of the estimated cost to replace the pool.

"It could be a lot more than $600,000 or it could be less, we are not sure at this point," he said. "There are people in this community that are out of work right now, adding taxes for this amount of could be a problem for the community, as well as the village."

Kadri said earlier that the village already has accumulated debt with the water treatment plant and are also looking at the purchase of a new fire truck.

Mayor Patterson later reported that when council first considered the tax levy idea, it was understood that it would be for a 1-mill levy. He said the bond attorney for the levy informed them that for the $600,000, it would actually be a 2.38-mill levy.

"We (the village) didn't feel we could place this cost on the local taxpayers for 30 years," Mayor Patterson said.

The projected cost to the owner of a $75,000 home would be about $75 per year. The bond issue was based on the $600,000 for the cost to replace the pool at a 5.5 percent interest rate.

According to Mayor Patterson, too many intangible issues were involved in the matter (final cost, interest rate changes and how the bond issue could affect the village's credit rating).

"We want the village to have a swimming pool but time is against us at this point. We need to look at maybe applying for grants and maybe even look at trying to have an aquatic center constructed later," he said.

The deadline for the issue to be considered for the November ballot was Aug. 4.