SUGARCREEK — The Board of Directors of The Jerry and Laura Jacobson Foundation, Inc., is pleased to announce the appointment of Noel B. Poirier as the Foundation’s and The Age of Steam Roundhouse’s Executive Director. He began his new role July 16, 2018.

Board Chairman and President of The Jerry and Laura Jacobson Foundation, Bill Strawn, said, "We are very fortunate and excited to have Noel Poirier join our organization. His proven leadership, museum development skills, and demonstrated forward vision will introduce Jerry Jacobson's steam locomotive collection and historically constructed facility for public viewing and appreciation. Noel's grasp of the significant importance that The Age of Steam Roundhouse offers all who visit will undoubtedly propel it toward becoming a world destination." The selection of Mr. Poirier to lead The Age of Steam Roundhouse is the culmination of a national search involving the review of many candidates. It reflects the Foundation’s desire to continue its efforts in being at the forefront of steam locomotive preservation by continuing Jerry Jacobson’s desire to share his efforts and enthusiasm with the public and for posterity.

Mr. Poirier is an experienced museum professional with a demonstrated history of success in managing museums and other not-for-profit industrial institutions. In the past, Mr. Poirier has worked for The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation in Williamsburg, Virginia; two living historical farms in Pennsylvania; Historic Bethlehem Partnership in Bethlehem, Pa.; and most recently as the National Watch & Clock Museum’s Director where he guided it to being awarded the coveted accreditation by the American Alliance of Museums.

"I welcome the opportunity to carry forward Jerry Jacobson’s vision for The Age of Steam Roundhouse and guide it toward becoming the premier destination for enthusiasts of railroad history and steam locomotives," stated Mr. Poirier. "The collection, these facilities, this work occurring at the Roundhouse all make it a natural attraction for tourism, yet it will still be accessible and interesting for those visitors who have not yet caught the railroading bug. I look forward to playing an important part in attracting more visitors to this region."